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20131028
20131105
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CSPAN 37
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English 37
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that science and engineering is good to do because they will see it on the paper, there will be calls for go ice s to help us fish wrg there is an ocean of water that's been liquid for billions of years. we're going to dig through the soils of mars and look for life. look at the nasa portfolio today. biology, chemist, planetry geeology, aerospace engineers. all the stem fields. science technology engineering and math represent ed in the nasa portfolio. a healthy nasa is a fly wheel that society caps for innovations. book tv, every weekend on c- span2. >> this week on q&a, stephen kinzer discusses his new book, titled "the brothers: john foster dulles, allen dulles, and their secret world war." >> stephen kinzer, in your book, you tell a story up front about dulles airport in washington and the statue and the naming. what is that? >> john foster dulles had
, that is all occurring at the intersections of markets and sciences. united states and the course of its entrepreneurial system and the course -- and the way that it teaches at schools of the way that our kids grow up in the system, to look at opportunity and to go at the answer and work humanw to reduce footprints on the planet, these are the things that make the united states attractive part of the roof to invest in. you can do it here. 70% of all of the r&d is done in the united states. 70%. not to say that it should be done elsewhere. i not united states is unbeatable for that. the dow is putting its money where its mouth is. $5 billion against -- value adding. we are putting thousands of jobs up in $100 billion in place for the united states that will create new jobs in the next several years. a lot of that will be exporting rains and a little bit abroad -- brains and a little bit of brawn. thank you. >> thank you. [applause] >> i know one of your many strengths is looking at the long-term, sustainable growth of the economy. help the audience understand how in creating policies you
to invest and the essential pillars of economic growth like education, workforce readiness, science, research and innovation. i believe there are significant savings that can be achieved in our health care system without compromising the quality of care, and in fact, improving the quality of care. and without slashing benefits that seniors have worked so hard for and earned. former secretary-treasurer he paul o'neill has estimated we can save $1 trillion per year without affecting health care outcomes by in acting smart, targeted health care delivery reforms. the institute of medicine estimated the number could be 750 billion dollars. no matter what the exact figure or proposal, these are impressive savings that would strengthen the nation's health- care system without shifting cost and burdens to seniors and states. these have the added benefit of improving quality, -- quality outcomes within the health-care system. so before we continue to obsessively but benefits on the table, i would hope to begin the dialogue about finding solutions that produce health-care cost savings. i am c
kind, that is all occurring at the intersections of markets and sciences. and the united states, the course -- because of his entrepreneurial system, because of what it teaches in the schools, specially universities, because of the ways kids grow up in the system, to look at opportunity, not a problem. to go at the answer, to work out the how to make the path were great, how to reduce the human footprint on the planet -- these are the things that make united states the attractive part of the work to invest in, because you can do it here. 70% of all the dow r&d in united states is done in the united states. right now the united states is unbeatable for that. second, the value added on resources, how is putting its money where its mouth is. we're putting 5 billion dollars against the national gas advantage that was talked about. we are putting thousands of jobs at work. this will create up to 2 million jobs in the next several years. a lot of that will be exporting brains and of course a little bit of iran. >> thank you, andrew. [applause] having heard from these three global busi
. hire more teachers in math and science and help more kids afford a college education. we can keep doling out corporate welfare, or we can invest in renewable energy that creates jobs and lowers carbon pollution. priorities, choices, that is what this is about. and the stakes for the middle class couldn't be higher. if we don't pick the right priorities now, make the right choices now, we could hinder growth and opportunity for decades and leave our children with something less. that includes the obsession with cutting just for the sake of cutting. that doesn't help our economy grow. it will hold us back. remember, our deficits are getting smaller, not bigger. on my watch their falling at the fastest pace in 60 years. that gives us room to fix our long-term debt problems without sticking it to young people or undermining our bedrock retirement and health security programs or cutting basic research that helps us grow. here is the bottom line. congress should pass a budget that cut things we don't need and closes wasteful tax loopholes that don't help create jobs so that we can free
need to make an equal commitment to help education infrastructure and science investments that will secure our future. those agree areas -- taxes, the question of better care and lower cost through medicare reforms and budget fairness strike me as three areas where we can, as colleagues have side, come together and find common ground. i look forward to working with all of you to do that. >> thank you. mr. clyburn. >> the task of this committee is to an agreement budget. while it would've been prudent to have these negotiations last summer, i am pleased that we are now beginning these important discussions. we must address the automatic spending cuts that are hurting our economy and undercutting important priorities like education, medical research, and national security. but we must put our nation's fiscal house in order and reduce our debt to a manageable level. there are different ways to do this. some are better than others. on the graph you see on the screens, there are two lines. the red line tops the deficit over the past six years. the blue line charts the -- the re
employees for load resulting in $2 billion in lost wages around the country. 2000 fewer national science foundation competitive awards affecting more than 21,000 teachers, students, and technicians. less for the department of energy's office of the unitedsking states' leadership role in advanced computing. on investment for publicly funded scientific research and development is somewhere between 30% and 100% or more. at a time when economic success in the global market is determined more than ever by the pace of innovation, we cannot afford to reduce our investments in research. these cuts, which will only get are forcing impossible choices for american families. should mothers quit their jobs when their children lose access to head start? should promising young students rethink a career in science because of a lack of available research dollars? in addition to furloughs for andnse employees reductions to military readiness, the department of defense will lose $20 billion more in mid-january if we don't act to avoid another year of scoop -- sequester cuts. everyone in this conference has
and sciences. and the united states, the course -- because of his entrepreneurial system, because of what it teaches in the schools, specially universities, because of the ways kids grow up in the system, to look at opportunity, not a problem. to go at the answer, to work out the how to make the path were great, how to reduce the human footprint on the problem -- on the planet -- these are the things that make united states the attractive part of the work to invest in, because you can do it here. 70 are sent of all the dow r and inn united states is done the united states. right now the united states is unbeatable for that. second, the value added on resources, how is putting its money where its mouth is. we're putting 5 billion dollars against the national gas advantage that was talked about. we are putting thousands of jobs at work or at -- at work. this will create up to 2 million jobs in the next several years. a lot of that will be exporting brains and of course a little bit of iran. >> thank you, andrew. [applause] having heard from these three global business leaders, gene, i know
the ravages of mother nature. the cost of climate inaction is severe. climate change is an issue of science, it's certainly an issue of public health, and most definitely it's an issue of economics. economic vitality. earlier, the sustainable energy and environmental coalition, which is a number a growing number, 56 to be exact, of democrats in the house, looking to bring about significant policy reforms that speak to the environmental and energy needs of this nation began to provide a laser sharp focus on the cost of climate change to our economy. in 2011 and 2012, there were some 25 extreme weather events that caused at least $1 billion each or more in damages. total estimated damages were approaching $200 billion and cost to taxpayers, $136 billion. the cost to individual taxpayers $1 billion. talled so we know that there is a tremendous impact here that has en realized by the lack of a focus on to climate change and global warming. as we continue to look at recovery, even from irene and in the upstate new york area as we look at the impact of damage that came with superstorm sandy, as w
opportunity using science and technology to create a better understanding of landscapes than ever before. important conservation goals and achieve our development objectives together. it is not an either/or. as we seek to meet president 20,000 ohl of approving megawatts of renewable energy on public lands. it is a goal that my predecessor made huge strides in. in southern california, we are working with the state on something called the desert renewable energy conservation plan. it is an ambitious plan. we intend to understand conservation objectives. we will be blending science and satellite data and also high- priority conservation land in the mojave desert. it is interesting because i happen to know to young scientists, who both did some of their early work by counting desert tortoises. i did not know why they were counting desert tortoises until i came to this job. i came to the fish and wildlife service to understand its habitat. beyond the desert, southwest, the mojave desert, we are also going to take in approach -- an approach in alaska. we want to protect over 13 million acres.
land to do it, but will do it in a safe and responsible way. >> the national academy of sciences released a review 150 days ago on blm's controversial watercourse program, saying continuation of usual practices will be unproductive for the public. ands the interior blm embrace these reforms? >> the question about how we effectively manage the wild program isurro one that people feel passionately about. it is difficult. there is not a secretary that i've talked to, and i have talked to them going back to the 1970's, that has not been aware of this issue and struggled with it. it is not easy. it is actually quite a call. the national academy of sciences gave us a report. it was very helpful in a couple of ways. one is it validated what our land managers know, which is forces are really good at reproducing. really good at reproducing. the her doubles in size every 3 1/2 years. that is a lot of horses, and provided they have forge, that gives them the opportunity to grow dramatically and not in a sustainable way, which the academy pointed that. earthcontrol is an all -- control is an
, aerospace engineers, electrical the stem fields. science, technology, engineering, and math. nasa is a wheel that a healthy society cap. >> book tv has aired 40,000 programs about nonfiction books and authors. >> next, a discussion about privacy versus security. the rand corporation hosted this panel, which includes the special agent in charge of intelligence in the senior aclu attorney. this is just under an hour. >> let me introduce the speakers. you are going to figure out who they are once they start to talk to they are not seated yet. it's a great topic and a great panel. henry is one of the young stars. analyst and senior a professor at the graduate school. that is him at the far end. he is an expert on risk analysis and decision techniques across a wide range of issues and recently testified before it toss, applying homeland issues. george, in charge of intelligence. we are glad george can represent the agency tonight. he has been in various capacities for the fbi, focusing on intelligence and weapons of mass instruction. to fort taken him hoover, and he also has been the on scene com
that science and engineering is good to do, because they will see it writ large on the paper. there will be calls for engineers to help us go ice fishing where there is a notion of water that has been liquid for billions of years. we are going to dig through the soils of mars and look for life. look at the nasa portfolio today. chemistry, physics, geology -- planetary geology -- chemical engineers, mechanical engineers, all the stem fields represented in the nasa portfolio. umps that, asa p flywheel that society taps for innovations. >> booktv has aired over 40,000 programs about nonfiction books and authors. booktv, every weekend on c- span2. "washington journal" continues. host: we are back to the last remaining minutes of "washington to go outsideant washington and in your take on whether congress should endorse or stop the nsa spying program. you have seen the papers this morning, that president obama was made aware is past summer about spying on allies, and the head of the intelligence feinstein, said that that is a big problem and she would like to see a total review of
health best itthe very path -- can offer, including the national institute of science, the national institute of health, the center for disease control, everything our public health systems within our state have brought together over these many years, and then do that in combination with the private sector so that we can take the entrepreneurial advantage that the private sector can bring to this remedy, and then take science and technology, most notably the genomic project that is going on that has untold benefits, what the american people want to see is to help them out, to solve their problem, to help them get better health care. end do not want to see this lists, less filling debate from the committee. i challenge the chairman, let's do what we did with tax reform and break down into individual groups and solve this problem together so that we are taking the best of the public sector the best of the private sector, and all of it, innovation, technology, can bring to bear on changing the paradigm for the american citizen. so it is their health and well- being that becomes the foc
the national institute of science, national institute of health, centers for disease control, everything our public health systems in our state has brought together over these many years, and do that in combination with the private sector so that we can take the entrepreneurial advantage that the private sector can bring to this remedy. then that takes science and technology, most notably the genomic project going on with untold benefits. what the american people want to see is to help them out, to solve their problem, to help them get better health care. they don't want to see this endless tastes great/less filling debate from the committee. i challenge the chairman. let's do what we did with tax reform. break down to individual groups and solve this problem together so we are taking the best of the public sector, the best of the private sector, and all that innovation technology can bring to bear on changing the paradigm for the american citizen. so it's their health and well being that becomes the focus, not the ideology of either party. but the health and well-being of the american citiz
money now to rebuild the infrastructure of this country and invest in education, invest in basic science whether it is biomedical or other forms of science that would create jobs down the road, those are all good reasons to borrow. simplisticrty antagonism toward any form of debt or deficits is not only misplaced, it is foolhardy and you cannot be out there saying i and at the same time you strangle it of funding. down,ole government shut by some estimates, cost $24 billion in economic activity. people lost jobs and paychecks and were not hired and we are still reeling from that. that is just not good policy. host: here is a tweet -- thanks for writing in. i think right now there is absolutely no telling. as anybody who watches c-span knows, the news cycles just get quicker and quicker and shorter and shorter. we will have another government budget and debt ceiling fight or some episode engendering february. it may happen again in the summer or next fall or before the election. by and large, the government shut down drove everybody's numbers down but particularly republicans and they wer
of the time in high schools today. science and plaques like this, you know, we're number one. all about achievement. things like this. and i find out a little bit ironic in a way. but it relates exactly to what ben is saying. >> talking not only their own personal slogans but slogans for the high schools. banners on the wall. i've seen them myself. where does it come from in this society? and do you have any idea whether it's done in other countries? >> it's done less in other countries. i mentioned it was a school because it's a still shot inside the high school. we're putting things of his life together in that part of the film. where did it come from. i think americans are instilled with this amazing self-esteem. this past generation has been. my generation was to a lesser extent. but in reality, it's gone astray. >> it instilled me with values that i could achieve certain things. i don't think if i thought highly of myself i could go out and make a film that people don't necessarily believe in and work on for seven years and finish it. but there's a certain entitlement a lot of the
, the congress shall have power to promote the progress of science, huesful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. while this provision in the constitution and only place in the constitution, the body of the constitution where the word right is used. bill of rights comes into the amendment process of the constitution but our founding fathers thought so highly of technology and tech noling advancement, the right of inventors was included in the body of the constitution and this provision served america well. it's led to general prosperity that we would not have had otherwise. it has led to national security where we faced foes who outnumbered us so heavily but we relied on the technologies that were developed to help our armed forces defend themselves and thus defend the country and of course, served us well, because the technology and the freedom we have has created a society where ordinary people, decent people can live very fruitful lives and can enjoy the fruits of their labor. americans work hard. and t
museum in jackson, mississippi, and the museum of natural science. george has been featured in many national shows such as southern living. -- e accolades are a test testament. i would like to recognize mr. george berry sr. on his achievements both as an artist and as a teacher. for more than 50 years, george has used his god-given gift as a skillman craftsman to make beautiful pieces of art. today he continues to graciously share his knowledge and skill with many others. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1, the chair declares the house in recess until noon health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius will appear before a house committee tomorrow. the house energy and commerce committee, that is scheduled for 9:00 a.m. eastern. a couple of other hearings to mention, this afternoon, national intelligence director, health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius will appear before a house committee tomorrow. the house energy and commerce committee, that is
in may. he attended cross bury high school, and received his bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering and computer science from the university of connecticut. he's a veteran of three space flights having logged nearly 40 days in space. he continues to be an inspiration for students back home in connecticut and around the world. we wish him the best of luck and a safe journey. thank you. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from texas is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. mr. conaway: just how the unaffordable care act as i'm often corrected back home in district 11, let's look at recent headlines about the launch of the new website. the "orlando sentinel" called it a hit or miss proposition. cnn called it, americans are still having a tough time. what an understatement. we all know how about the obamacare website built with taxpayer dolla
science whether it is biomedical or other forms of science that would create jobs down the road, those are all good reasons to orrow. this tea party simplistic antagonism toward any form of debt or deficits is not only misplaced, it is foolhardy and you cannot be out there saying i am for jobs and at the same time ou strangle it of funding. the whole government shutdown by some estimates, cost $24 billion in economic activity. people lost jobs and paychecks and were not hired and we are still reeling from that. that is just not good policy. host: on the subject of the shutdown. communist dog rights -- writes in on twitter -- guest: thanks for writing in. i think right now there is absolutely no telling. as anybody who watches c-span knows, the news cycles just get quicker and quicker and shorter and shorter. we will have another government budget and debt ceiling fight or some episode engendering february. it may happen again in the summer or next fall or before the election. by and large, the government shut down drove everybody's numbers down but particularly republicans and they wer
that science and engineering is good to do because they'll see it large on the paper. there will be calls for engineers to help us go eyes fishing where there is an ocean of liquid for billions of years. we're going to dig through the soils and look for life. look at the nasa portfolio today. it's got biology, chemistry, physics, aerospace engineers, electrical engineers, all the stem fields. science technology, engineering and math represented in the nasaport. a healthy nasa pump that is. it's a fly wheel that society taps for invasions. >> over the past 15 years book tv aired over 40,000 programs about non-fiction books and thors. ? what's the most important issue congress should consider in 2014? that's the question for middle and high school students in span's student video cam competition. include c-span video for your chance to twin grand prize of $5,000 and we double the number of winners and prices this year. need more information go to student cam.org. >> on thursday tennessee senator bob corker the top republican corker was addressing the ambassador to syria at this hearing. it
are investments in infrastructure, education, science, and technology. when you add in the interest of the public debt, two thirds of the budget is medicare, medicaid, and social security. is and where the money that is where we going to make progress in the future. host: we will go to carl in chicago, illinois on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. you are just saying something about a balance between spending and revenue. i think you have it wrong. this is where the problem is. in 2000, we had a balanced budget. republicans chose to take all of the surplus and have tax cuts. they say that we could have a war. they said it would not cost us a dime. it cost us $1 trillion. then we also had the recession. americans lost three percent of their net worth. we lost gdp. this probably comes to maybe about a couple trillion dollars. this is not about the entitlements. not that they cannot be reforms. our principal problem is because we did not raise the taxes to pay for these things. it is not because we were spending too much. you cannot buy a yacht and take six months off of work. those were
about science. i listen to your opening statement. >> and about the steps we are taking to protect our national security interests. i will began and then transition to general alexander. ofs hearing is a key part the discussion our nation needs to provide the intelligence authority toh protect privacy and civil liberties. all of us in the intelligence committee are aware that unauthorized disclosures have raised serious concerns that you alluded to here in congress and across the nation about our intelligence at the release. the nation wants to know how the intelligence community uses its authority and if we can be trusted to use them appropriately. we believe we have been lawful and the rigorous oversight has been effect it. we welcome this opportunity to make a case to the public. as we engage in this discussion, it is important that our decisions no that the details of these programs has been extremely damaging. these disclosures are threatening our ability to conduct intelligence and keep our country safe. erase or makey to up for the damage that has already been done. we anticipat
to the power of thanks to the power of i.t., advances in cognitive sciences, we have an opportunity at this moment that only comes along rarely in higher education. i believe the potential now advances,se these improve learning outcomes, and to reduce the cost of education. figure much. -- thank you very much. thank you for this opportunity to be here. i want to acknowledge senator burke and senator hagan who are such great champions of our community colleges. four years ago, north carolina community college leaders met and declared student success to be the primary strategic focus of the north carolina community college system. student success is our focus in strategic planning. it was not that we did not focus on it before, it changed the culture somewhat to focus on success as much as we focused on access. we know how many students make it through our registration line and how many cross our graduation statements. stay community college leaders travel nearly 14,000 miles attending listening sessions and from those we documented 200 college-based success innovations, 75 barriers,
strategies and former federal prosecutor. and eugene stafford, professor of computer science and insurance security at purdue university. the university. we will do another round of five minute questioning after introductory comments. >> my apologies for being a few minutes late. but i'm glad to be here. i consider myself one of your grandmothers. i was a principal co-author of law of 2004,nce which established you. and one of the tragedies, i think history will record, is that you were not fully functioning until may of 2013. that is about 8.5 years lost of a very critical mission. let me just say that a goal in the law, certainly my personal goal was to have in the law certainty that liberty and security were reinforcing values in the policies and practices that we established under the law. is -- if ever that function were needed, it is right now. me that youunate to were one of the best kept secrets in washington. i know you are making a massive effort to get out there and i commend you for it. urgenthink the need is and you, uniquely among the different groups in looking at arepolicie
and a conversation on the role of third parties in american politics with a political science professor. watch "washington journal" at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. and today johnson and johnson greed to pay $2 billion to resolve that they approved psychiatric drugs. ey are accused of paying kickbacks to pharmacists and doctors. attorney general holder announced the decision today at the justice department. >> good morning, thank you all for being here. i am going to be joined by the associate attorney general, assistant attorney general, the united states attorney for the eastern district of pennsylvania, the u.s. attorney for the district of massachusetts, first assistant united states attorney for the northern district of california, and the deputy inspector general for investigations of the department of health and human services. we are here today to announce that johnson and johnson and three of its subsidiaries have agreed to pay more than $2.2 billion to resolve criminal and civil claims they marketed prescription drugs for uses that were never approved, safe, or effective. there were kickba
and marine science at the university of south florida, and finally, we'll all remember his work on behalf of sick children and creating a national registry for bone marrow donors. he has left behind a rich legacy that we as members of congress must all aspire to achieve. the chairman was never afraid to reach across the aisle and worked for the greater good. i'm extremely thankful that i was able to express my gratitude to him last week when i visited him at his bedside and i told him how much all of his colleagues loved him and his constituents appreciated all that he did for them. in closing, my father, former sent ssman mike bilirakis to him. dear bill. since we are roughly the same age, remember i'm five months older, so we joked about respecting your elders. we have expected that this day would come for both of us, but first for me and not so soon. we grew up in the same pittsburgh area at the same time, tough depression, poverty, which made us tough. we didn't know each other then, decreed we our lord would meet years later. we worked hard and became successful, the good old america
to a science. i'm thinking, financially, i'm taking the oath of office in cold january 2005 and my grandfather is pumped up in front of me -- keep yourself strong, financially. i knew my state was and we could be. i put all of my efforts -- i won by a big mandate. i used every bit of capital of mine and i said there are two things you don't waste and politics. you don't waste a mandate and you don't waste a crisis. you better make something good out of them. i had a great mandate. i was determined to fix the finances of our state. i think we did do that. i think i with my administrative staff, we worked hard. we went through the recession better than most any state in the nation, one of the top three states in the nation. never cut act in education, never cut back on rock rooms for our children or seniors. we expanded for people in need. we had ourselves financially strong. i come here and my number one goal is fix the finances. raising debt. sooner or later, someone has got to fix the debt. i hope to achieve. i'm working hard across the aisle, talking to everybody. is there a way we can move
science. he was invited with less than a week's notice to come before this committee. he couldn't make it that day. he asked for some other day. he went to omb and had nothing to do with the solyndra contract. did he come before us and talk about it. the sole role is to represent omb. i don't think he ought -- there ought to be any disparagement of him. he is a very wealth regarded public servant. >> the gentleman's public will stand. >> thank you, mr. chairman. welcome madam secretary. now we all agree the website problems must be resolved. this country invented and developed internet and the concept of the web sites. so there are high expectations. the fact that the hired private contractors didn't build the website in three years is inexcusable. i hope those at fault will be held accountable. we can't lose sight of the big picture that, when this is all said and done every american will have affordable quality health insurance and health care. this is a goalie believe of all democrats and republicans. the aca is working in california and is working in my district in sacramento. i ju
is quoted in "the christian science monitor" as saying it is a raw deal for the young. he said premiums will go up for young people to subsidize the elders. guest: i think his facts are wrong. if you look at the numbers that are coming out, they are actually lower than anticipated. again, if you make $17,000 a year, you are a young person, you can find a plan for $15 a month, $40 a month, and potentially less. if you make $25,000 a year, you might find a plan for $75 a month, $100 a month. the uninsured single, young adult population would qualify for insurance under $50 a month. fail to those studies take into account the subsidies which disproportionately help people at the lower end of the economic spectrum, which happens to be a lot of young people. host: well, the penalties for the uninsured in 2014 -- next year it will be $95 per adult, or one percent of family income, whichever is lower. 3 hundred $25 per adult, in2% of income, and finally 2016, 600 $95 per adult, or 2.5% of family income. the think those are fair? guest: it is important to have a system where everybody pays in.
there is a very legitimate debate over which side is more likely to win. all this is sort of art based on science. it is a little bit of both. , first of all, jennifer duffy, our senate or governor, editor. she has been doing this since 1988. i have been doing it since 1984. have seen every seat come out. what we hear from strategist, what we have from people was talked in the state, what the numbers look like. what the opposition looks like. restart a for the general assessment and these things evolve over the course of an election cycle. mcconnell oftch kentucky. the senate republican leader and the democratic side mark dreier who is seeking reelection. then you have to currently democratic seats that are leaning republican in montana and west virginia. a number of lean democratic seats held by democrats baggage another in indiana, mary landrieu in indiana. carl levin is retiring in michigan and kay hagan who is seeking reelection in north carolina. the way i start offending it up seatsre are 34 democratic that are not up this time. 31 republican. then thereabouts seven gimme putts for democrat
on science and technology, transportation and infrastructure, she co-chairs the woman's caucus and she is the chair of the democratic women's working group. she also co-founded the national network to end domestic violence in 1994. she was the executive director. am proud to ask my colleague, the honorable donna edwards, to consume as much time as she may. ms. edwards: i thank the gentleman and i thank you very and i know that you join with your colleague, mr. poe of texas, in hosting this hour so that we can have an opportunity to remember why it is that we identify and commemorate domestic violence awareness month. and to make a commitment from this day forward and this coming year to the next time when we have this observance to do what we can to end domestic violence. and i think after all that is the goal. i can't remember, mr. green, when i first became interested in domestic violence. and even aware of domestic violence. but i look back to the times when i was growing up, i grew up in a military family, and we lived in very close quarters and our neighbors, we shared a wall in t
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)